“There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all of time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and it will be lost. The world will not have it. It is not your business to determine how good it is nor how valuable nor how it compares with other expressions. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open. You do not even have to believe in yourself or your work. You have to keep yourself open and aware to the urges that motivate you. Keep the channel open. … No artist is pleased. No satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a queer divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others.”
— Martha Graham

http://collectdotgive.org/editions/melanie-flood/

For $100 you can own one of my photographs & support two great organizations- collect.give and Mental Health America.

September is national suicide awareness month. In loving memory of my friend Sasha Wolfe, I will donate 100% of proceeds to Mental Health America, the nation’s oldest advocacy organization addressing the full spectrum of mental health and substance use conditions. MHA is dedicated to promoting mental health, preventing mental and substance use conditions and achieving victory over mental illnesses and addictions through advocacy, education, research and service.

I was thinking about Amanda Ross-Ho in the shower, Loofahs on hand-drilled particle board, 8’ x 4’ © 2012 Melanie Flood

after,

Expose for the Shadows, Develop for the Highlights (Perforated Sampler): White Light, Crewel Point, Triangle 208.33%, Glasses (His), Portrait (Hers). 2010. Hand-drilled Sheetrock, wood, latex paint, chromogenic color prints, CNC-cut acrylic, acrylic on canvas, 96 x 72 x 5″ (243.8 x 182.9 x 12.7 cm). © 2010 Amanda Ross-Ho

Craziest room divider, ever, designed by Ettore Sottsass in 1981.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Jo Ann Callis.
If you know the work of Jeff Wall or Gregory Crewdson or Marilyn Minter, you should know Callis, whose work anticipated theirs. Starting in the early 1970s Callis has constructed both black-and-white and color photographs that consider, sex, sexuality, pleasure and more pleasure.
Aperture has just published “Other Rooms,” a new book of Callis’ investigations of the nude body and sexuality, mostly from the mid-1970s. Amazon offers it for $54. And on Tuesday, June 17th, Callis and Lesley A. Martin will discuss the project at Aperture on West 27th Street in New York. Their conversation starts at 6:30pm.
Callis is one of the most important photographers of her generation. In two thousand nine the J. Paul Getty Museum presented a retrospective of her work titled "Woman Twirling." Callises are in the permanent collection of museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 
At top is Callis’ Nude Facing Wall (1976-77). Below it is Man with Lines (1976-77). These two pictures are on back-to-back pages in Callis’ new Aperture book. Callis and host Tyler Green discuss these pictures on this week’s show, especially as pictures not of bondage precisely, but of restraint.
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 


Wish I was in New York for this- thankfully there will be a podcast thanks to Modern Art Notes. manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Jo Ann Callis.
If you know the work of Jeff Wall or Gregory Crewdson or Marilyn Minter, you should know Callis, whose work anticipated theirs. Starting in the early 1970s Callis has constructed both black-and-white and color photographs that consider, sex, sexuality, pleasure and more pleasure.
Aperture has just published “Other Rooms,” a new book of Callis’ investigations of the nude body and sexuality, mostly from the mid-1970s. Amazon offers it for $54. And on Tuesday, June 17th, Callis and Lesley A. Martin will discuss the project at Aperture on West 27th Street in New York. Their conversation starts at 6:30pm.
Callis is one of the most important photographers of her generation. In two thousand nine the J. Paul Getty Museum presented a retrospective of her work titled "Woman Twirling." Callises are in the permanent collection of museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 
At top is Callis’ Nude Facing Wall (1976-77). Below it is Man with Lines (1976-77). These two pictures are on back-to-back pages in Callis’ new Aperture book. Callis and host Tyler Green discuss these pictures on this week’s show, especially as pictures not of bondage precisely, but of restraint.
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 


Wish I was in New York for this- thankfully there will be a podcast thanks to Modern Art Notes.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Jo Ann Callis.

If you know the work of Jeff Wall or Gregory Crewdson or Marilyn Minter, you should know Callis, whose work anticipated theirs. Starting in the early 1970s Callis has constructed both black-and-white and color photographs that consider, sex, sexuality, pleasure and more pleasure.

Aperture has just published “Other Rooms,” a new book of Callis’ investigations of the nude body and sexuality, mostly from the mid-1970s. Amazon offers it for $54. And on Tuesday, June 17th, Callis and Lesley A. Martin will discuss the project at Aperture on West 27th Street in New York. Their conversation starts at 6:30pm.

Callis is one of the most important photographers of her generation. In two thousand nine the J. Paul Getty Museum presented a retrospective of her work titled "Woman Twirling." Callises are in the permanent collection of museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 

At top is Callis’ Nude Facing Wall (1976-77). Below it is Man with Lines (1976-77). These two pictures are on back-to-back pages in Callis’ new Aperture book. Callis and host Tyler Green discuss these pictures on this week’s show, especially as pictures not of bondage precisely, but of restraint.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Wish I was in New York for this- thankfully there will be a podcast thanks to Modern Art Notes.

Hanging out with my cotton candy (at Newspace Center for Photography)

The first person to email their name & address to MsFlood@gmail.com will receive one copy of my 11x14 booklet.

—Congratulations Karl Lind, you’ve won!

The best thing about Flood’s photographs is that they further erode the conceit, relativization or absurdity that photography is somehow a purposely empirical art form. And this is, if I may, good enough reason for Flood to make the photographs, for they duck our expectations.

On the occasion of my exhibition The Nature of Things, I have printed an offset color booklet in an edition of 300, designed by Scott Ponik. It will be available for sale at Newspace for $12 throughout the duration of the exhibition & in my online shop! Check it out!

Thank you Regional Arts & Culture Council for helping fund this publication.

Metronorth

This was probably the best overlooked thing to happen today.

I just made this great book! @MuseumModernArt @prjnyc Thanks MoMACopyShop & @polan for the custom cover. (at MoMA The Museum of Modern Art)

Come see my photographs at The Newspace Center of Photography! Open seven days a week until June 1!